Friday, February 1, 2013

Calisthenics and Kettlebells

Hey guys,

3 weeks ago, when I thought about a new attempt to become unbelievable fit, I had to decide which approach I should follow to gain the best results. I tried a lot over the past 15 years from "normal" (3 sets à 8-12 reps) gym training with machines over different split-training plans, German volume training, barbell and dumbbell stuff, fast and super slow training etc. Every time I learned something about the advantages and disadvantages of the different approaches. None of them seem to fit for me perfectly. I read some pretty interesting stuff about Kettlebells last year and also gave it a shot...guess what? It`s amazing to train with them! But I stopped it anyway....lack of motivation.

Thus, 3 weeks ago I decided that they should be a part of my new routine because I really had a good feeling (and great results!) with them and you can train almost everywhere because you don`t need much space (in later posts I'm going to integrate some videos to show you kettlebell exercises).

But just work out with the bells seems to boring for me in the long run...as you know I stopped training with them after all last year. So I need at least one more part for my plan...that's where "Convict Conditioning" from Paul Wade comes in....
CC is about six major exercises that you can perform with your own bodyweight (and some talk about training in jail and how bad "normal" gym training is etc.). Anyway I obtained copies of his first and second book and I read both books in 4 day...very interesting stuff and it seemed to me as if it's worth a shot. Paul Wade broke each of his major exercises (pushup, pullup, squat, leg raise, bridge, handstand pushup) down in 10 steps. Every next step is a harder version of the same movement (e.g. pushup series starts with wall pushups, than incline pushups, then kneeling pushups...) so (over a long time) you could progress up to the so-called master step (which are definitely for the masters!).

So Convict Conditioning is the second part of my new training.

Next time I write about how I designed my training plan for reaching my goals.

Cheers,
Andi